Ufer Grounding | Construction and DIY projects | Forums

A A A
Avatar

Please consider registering
Guest

Search

— Forum Scope —






— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

Register Lost password?
sp_Feed F-Construction-and-DIY
Ufer Grounding
Avatar
Gravel Road
Rancher
Members
Forum Posts: 1455
Member Since:
6 Oct ’15
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
1
20 Mar ’16 - 7:54 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Anyone up on this?

"The universe is wider than our views of it." -HDT
Avatar
K
Admin
Forum Posts: 31785
Member Since:
15 Feb ’12
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
2
20 Mar ’16 - 9:59 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

no and neither should you be, you are waaaaayyy overthinking this

has your electrician or mason recommended it?

Avatar
Gravel Road
Rancher
Members
Forum Posts: 1455
Member Since:
6 Oct ’15
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
3
21 Mar ’16 - 6:20 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Not over thinking it (at least this part)  It's actually part of the NEC now for residential, not optional. The electrician is pulling info today from the engineer he works with, then we can make sure we stub out the rebar correctly to meet the NEC.

The ones I put in the past had two 8' rods in the ground, 6' apart, joined with a loop of twisted copper...times have a changed.

"The universe is wider than our views of it." -HDT
Avatar
K
Admin
Forum Posts: 31785
Member Since:
15 Feb ’12
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
4
21 Mar ’16 - 6:53 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

seriously? And here I was thinking you were just trying to make a faraday cage out of your bunker. 🙂

Is this now code for all construction?

Avatar
Gravel Road
Rancher
Members
Forum Posts: 1455
Member Since:
6 Oct ’15
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
5
21 Mar ’16 - 7:03 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

To my understanding, yes.  NEC all the way.  My Codes Officer insisted it was spec'd on the plans...it was the only thing he was insistent on.

"The universe is wider than our views of it." -HDT
Avatar
K
Admin
Forum Posts: 31785
Member Since:
15 Feb ’12
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
6
21 Mar ’16 - 7:12 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

weird, it has supposedly been around since the 40's but first hit the NEC books in 2005

At a recent seminar, one of the attendees asked, “What is a ‘Ufer’ ground?” This is a common question. A “Ufer” ground is slang for what the National Electrical Code (NEC) addresses as a concrete-encased grounding electrode. The term “Ufer” does not appear in the Code, but many in the industry use it. Ufer is the name of the engineer who created it as a solution to significant grounding problems discovered by the U.S. military.


The NEC defines the term “grounding electrode” as “a conducting object through which a direct connection to earth is established.” The 2005 NEC first defined the term, and the definition has been subsequently revised to describe how electrodes function and to apply to conductive objects or materials that qualify as grounding electrodes. An important feature of this definition is that the electrode is in direct contact with the earth, making a connection. It is important to remember that, without a connection to the earth, there is no grounding. Let’s take a closer look at what constitutes a concrete-encased electrode (Ufer), when it is required, and the installation techniques.


Details and description


Section 250.52(A)(3) clearly specifies what constitutes a concrete-encased electrode. The concrete-encased electrode can be bare, zinc-galvanized, or other steel reinforcing bars or rods of not less than ½ inch in diameter coated in electrically conductive material. It can be installed in one continuous 20-foot length, or, if in multiple pieces, it can be connected by the usual steel tie wires, exothermic welding, welding or other effective means to create a 20-foot or greater length. A concrete-encased electrode can also be constructed using 20 feet or more of bare copper conductor not smaller than 4 AWG. Note that the 20 feet of conductive rods or bare wire used in creating a concrete-encased electrode only establishes the connection to the concrete. The combination of the concrete and the conductive component serve as the grounding electrode as clarified in the definition of the term.


Mandatory grounding electrode system


Section 250.50 mandates the use of all grounding electrodes to form the grounding electrode system. This includes all concrete-encased electrodes present at the building or structure. An exception to Section 250.50 relaxes this mandatory requirement for existing buildings and structures in which connecting the concrete-encased electrode could damage the structural integrity of the building or otherwise disturb the existing construction. (Because the installation of the footings and foundation is one of the first elements of a construction project and, in most cases, has been completed by the time the electric service is installed, this rule necessitates an awareness and coordinated effort from designers and the construction trades to ensure the concrete-encased electrode is incorporated into the grounding electrode system during the placement of rebar and concrete footings.) If a concrete-encased electrode is not present at the building or structure, it is not required that a 4 AWG copper wire be used to form one, but it is an option.


Electrode performance


The concrete-encased electrode has proven that it offers optimal performance and longevity. The footing or foundation of any building will typically be there as long as the building is. Because all of the rebar in the bottom perimeter of the building footing is usually tied together with tie wires, the electrode acts similar to a ground ring, only it has much more surface area in the concrete connection to the earth. The footing is present around the bottom of the building perimeter, which means there is significant ground (earth) contact from concrete-encased electrodes. Concrete retains moisture and is continuously absorbing moisture through the bottom of the footing. This ensures an effective connection between the footing and the earth. The footing of a building is also typically the largest grounding electrode in each structure.


more http://www.ecmag.com.....fer-ground

Avatar
Gravel Road
Rancher
Members
Forum Posts: 1455
Member Since:
6 Oct ’15
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
7
21 Mar ’16 - 7:46 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Named after the guy that originally engineered it.  Looks like it became code in 2008 (in 2005 it was optional) Looks like there are a number of ways to do it.  Let's see what the Electrician finds out today.  I am thinking I just need to extend a length of #4 up through the block or stub up from footer so it is at the base of the first course (about an inch away from block).  Looks to be a great ground though. 

"The universe is wider than our views of it." -HDT
Avatar
K
Admin
Forum Posts: 31785
Member Since:
15 Feb ’12
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
8
21 Mar ’16 - 8:17 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

I'm going to have to call my electrician, we built in 2009 and he never even mentioned it which is surprising because he is all about code

Forum Timezone: America/New_York

Most Users Ever Online: 145

Currently Online:
19 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

easytapper: 2149

DangerDuke: 2030

groinkick: 1667

PorkChopsMmm: 1515

Gravel Road: 1455

Newest Members:

cabin creek

malaki neilson

kuffa

simson

4ccservive

Forum Stats:

Groups: 1

Forums: 12

Topics: 11454

Posts: 58643

 

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 2

Members: 1897

Moderators: 0

Admins: 1

Administrators: K