How To Make Pepperoni At Home

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Learning how to smoke meats is a great hobby and a way to save some money at the grocery store. Jerky, sausage and pepperoni are a few simple things you can make in just a few days. Below is quick tutorial that shows you how to make pepperoni at home.

List of ingredients.

  1. Mustard Seeds
  2. Garlic Salt
  3. Black Pepper
  4. Quick Cure
  5. Cayenne Pepper
  6. Ground Beef
  7. Casings

1A tablespoon of mustard seeds.

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2A tablespoon of garlic salt.

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3A tablespoon of black pepper.

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43 tablespoons of quick cure. Follow Packaging Recommendations.

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52 teaspoons of cayenne pepper

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6Mix well.

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7Put 5 pounds of ground beef in a large container.

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8Mix well, cover and set it in the fridge for 3 days.

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9Soak your casings to remove the brine.

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10Unwrap your meat mixture and grab your sausage stuffer.

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11Fill your stuffer.

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12Feed the a section of casing onto the jerky gun.

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13Tie off the end and poke a small hole for escaping air.

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14Slowly squeeze the gun trigger to fill the casing.

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15Twist every 12-18 inches to form a link.

16Cook one up on the grill for a taste test.

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17Hang the pepperoni in your smoker.

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18Start you coals in a chimney starter.

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19Use hardwood chunks, charcoal and wood chips.

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20Let the smoking begin.

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21About 5 hour later internal temps should be over 170.

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22Congratulations, you just made pepperoni.

It tastes like spicy kielbasa which I expected; a true pepperoni is aged like the pancetta I am working on, but I am very happy with the end results. I think I am going to work on a 40 pound batch next but I need to upgrade the stuffer; the gun works well for jerky but is not ideal for a large batch of sausage. If you would like to see how we built our smoker you can see it at the following link.

DIY Backyard Smoker

Smoking Food: A Beginner’s Guide

In Smoking Food, Chris Dubbs and Dave Heberle assure us that smoking is an art, not a science, and they fearlessly reveal that art’s essentials—and how simple they can be. They explain how to choose the best fuels (you can use corncobs!), how to build smokers from old refrigerators and cardboard boxes, and, of course, how to smoke everything from turkeys to turtles. Their advice is as ingenious and cost-conscious as any given by Alton Brown. Aware of the needs and wants of the modern cook, they include low-sodium preparations, alternatives to preservatives like sodium nitrite, and thoughts on safely handling meat.

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